Astro Coffee

Suggested papers for
Tue, Jun 27, 2017, Thu, Jun 29, 2017, and Fri, Jun 30, 2017 at 11:00 AM

21 Jun 2017

Superluminous transients at AGN centers from interaction between black-hole disk winds and broad-line region clouds

We propose that superluminous transients that appear at central regions of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) such as CSS100217:102913+404220 (CSS100217) and PS16dtm, which reach near or super-Eddington luminosities of the central black holes, are powered by the interaction between accretion disk winds and clouds in broad-line regions (BLRs) surrounding them. If the disk luminosity temporary increases by, e.g., limit-cycle oscillations, leading to a powerful radiatively driven wind, strong shock wav...

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21 Jun 2017

Predicting the locations of possible long-lived low-mass first stars: Importance of satellite dwarf galaxies

The search for metal-free stars has so far been unsuccessful, proving that if there are surviving stars from the first generation, they are rare, they have been polluted, or we have been looking in the wrong place. To predict the likely location of Population~III (Pop~III) survivors, we semi-analytically model early star formation in progenitors of Milky Way-like galaxies and their environments. We base our model on merger trees from the high-resolution dark matter only simulation suite \textit...

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21 Jun 2017

The All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae (ASAS-SN) Light Curve Server v1.0

The All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae (ASAS-SN) is working towards imaging the entire visible sky every night to a depth of V~17 mag. The present data covers the sky and spans ~2-5~years with ~100-400 epochs of observation. The data should contain some ~1 million variable sources, and the ultimate goal is to have a database of these observations publicly accessible. We describe here a first step, a simple but unprecedented web interface

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21 Jun 2017

A massive, dead disk galaxy in the early Universe

Sune Toft, Johannes Zabl, Johan Richard, Anna Gallazzi, + 8 more

At redshift z = 2, when the Universe was just three billion years old, half of the most massive galaxies were extremely compact and had already exhausted their fuel for star formation. It is believed that they were formed in intense nuclear starbursts and that they ultimately grew into the most massive local elliptical galaxies seen today, through mergers with minor companions, but validating this picture requires higher-resolution observations of their centres than is currently poss...

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Updated 2017/06/26 10:36:17